Widow’s Lake by Michael Monroe

ajhayes:

New review on Bold Book Blog! My review of Michael Monroe’s fantasy novella WIDOW’S LAKE.

Originally posted on Bold Book Blog:

Widow's Lake

Widow’s Lake by Michael Monroe

I downloaded this novella when it was free without hearing much about it. I thought I’d just read one paragraph to get an understanding of the book, and then continue reading another title I was in the middle of. Well, I was hooked by Monroe’s poetic prose and the world he created with magic users called “dancers,” and the story of an assassin vs. his prey. It seemed Monroe took his inspiration for the setting from feudal Japan. Although I figured out rather early where the plot would lead me, I enjoyed every moment of it, as Monroe’s guided me along with a deft pen and was able to stir emotions within me. Highly recommended!

Download Widow’s Lake by Michael Monroe from Amazon.com.

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An October to Remember

Greetings and salutations:

It’s been a bit since I last updated this blog. October has been a event-filled month for me, in both my personal life and in my writing/publishing career. Here are some of the highlights of my October:

  • Poet of the Month. The Poetry Company named me their Featured Poet for October. I shared a couple of poems and left a statement about myself and my writing. It was a great honor to be showcased by this group that is doing amazing things for poetry and poets.
  • College Visit. I was invited to speak to a class of Freshman Comp. students at Towson University. I talked about ways to use writing in everyday life, and a little about myself as a writer, poet and publisher.
  • Postcard Prose. My publishing company, Hidden Clearing Books, LLC, released its first installment in a series called Postcard Prose & Poems (PP&P). Basically it is a work of micro-fiction or a short poem on a postcard. The first one is a a micro-fiction piece by a gifted Baltimore writer, Timmy Reed, titled “The Bridge.” The illustration for the postcard was done by a guy I’ve worked with before, Goodloe Byron. Next month will be a short poem by another Baltimore writer, Stephanie M. Barber. They make great gifts for the holiday season or any occasion.
  • Exemplary Review. My poetry collection The Collected Poems of A. Jarrell Hayes was reviewed by Grace Cavalieri in her October 2013 Exemplars feature for Washington Independent Review of Books. In her review, she says, “[t]he poems are folkloric, mythical and personal. An intelligent rhetoric illustrates this poet’s life process.” I am pleased that my book was well-received.
  • Good King In Print. I finally released the first 3 books in the Good King Saga fantasy series in print. Books 1 & 2 are re-releases, while this is the first time book 3, Death of the Good King, has been in print. I’m excited by this accomplishment that took 9 years to happen!

October was full of treats for me, including receiving pleasant life-altering news. How was your month? Anything new you’d like to share? Leave a comment.

Happy Halloween,

A. Jarrell Hayes

On Human Stories

Greetings and salutations,

I recently read a blog post on PolicyMic.com by Gracie Jin titled “The One Thing White Writers Get Away With, But Authors of Color Don’t.” It’s a well-written piece about a double standard in literature: White writers can write about the life and times of people of other races, while writers of color must “write what they know.” I believe authors can write about whatever they want and can have whomever they want as prominent characters.

I find it interesting that authors of color or from another marginalized/discriminated against group (women, LGBT, Asian, Muslim, etc.) are often looked at as being spokespeople for said group. Some authors willingly accept this mantle, and go forth to be a voice for a group whose voice is silenced by the mainstream culture. I applaud them for doing so. However, not all authors are willing to take that stand, and the choice should be up to the writer, not society’s expectations. Author is the root word in authority, but that doesn’t make every author an authority on any subject other than themselves. And what do all authors have in common? They’re human.

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Release Day: The Collected Poems of A. Jarrell Hayes

collectedpoems_print2

Greetings and salutations!

Are you ready for poetry? Today’s the official release of The Collected Poems of A. Jarrell Hayes. This book weighs in at 298 pages, and combines 8 of my previously published collections into one volume. The books are: Heart and Soul of a Thinker, Just Another Angry Black Man, 100 + 1 Haiku, To Woman, From Man: Love Poems; The Poets Are Dead?, Seattle’s Hymn, The Enchanted Prince and Impromptu. Also included are poems I’ve had published in journals and magazines.

Here are what reviewers have said about the books in the collection:

“Quite colorful, delightfully eclectic, and decidedly inventive.” — RAWSISTAZ reviewers on Heart and Soul of a Thinker.

“A solid effort to bridge the ever-widening communication gap that exists between the sexes.” — Apex Reviews on To Woman, From Man: Love Poems.

“In a world where men aren’t very expressive, this collection will give readers a deeper look into the heart of man where true love resides. Hayes’ use of words tugs and moves the hearts of readers with much finesse.” — Kenya Mack for Writers-Vibe.com on To Woman, From Man: Love Poems.

“Without question this is the best book of poetry I’ve read in a long time.” — Poet Emmett Wheatfall on The Poets Are Dead?

To read sample poems from the collection, click here.

Buy The Collected Poems of A. Jarrell Hayes online:

Website
Publisher
Smashwords (ebook)

Give a poet a pen.